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Five New Black Poets to Watch: Voices Reshaping the Literary Landscape

Updated: Feb 4



A collage of pictures of young, successful black poets

The world of poetry has always been a space for diverse voices to weave narratives, challenge norms, and offer unique perspectives on the human experience. In recent years, a new wave of Black poets has emerged, captivating readers with their powerful words and fresh perspectives. In this blog post, we'll shine a spotlight on five exceptional poets who are redefining the literary landscape and contributing to the rich tapestry of voices in contemporary poetry.


Jericho Brown: Crafting Verse that Echoes Truths


Picture of Jericho Brown

Jericho Brown is a name that has been making waves in the poetry scene with his captivating verses that delve into the complexities of identity, race, and love. The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet is known for his keen observations and the emotional depth he brings to his work. His collection, "The Tradition," is a masterclass in exploring the intersections of personal and societal issues. View his work at https://www.jerichobrown.com/.


Amanda Gorman: A Beacon of Hope and Resilience



A picture of Amanda Gorman

Amanda Gorman captured the world's attention when she recited her poem "The Hill We Climb" at the 2021 Presidential Inauguration. Since then, she has become a symbol of hope and resilience, using her words to address social issues and inspire positive change. Gorman's poetry reflects a profound understanding of the power that words hold in shaping the collective consciousness. To view her work visit https://www.theamandagorman.com/.


Danez Smith: Fearless and Unapologetic Expression



Danez Smith is a force to be reckoned with, fearlessly addressing themes of race, queerness, and the intersectionality of identity. Their work, including the award-winning collection "Don't Call Us Dead," challenges conventional norms and pushes the boundaries of poetic expression. Smith's verses are a celebration of individuality and a call to dismantle oppressive structures. To view his work visit https://www.danezsmithpoet.com/bio-encore.


Eve L. Ewing: Bridging the Gap Between Academia and Poetry



Eve L. Ewing is a poet, scholar, and sociologist whose work seamlessly weaves together academic rigor and poetic beauty. Her collection "1919" explores the Chicago race riots and their lasting impact on the city. Ewing's ability to meld history with contemporary issues makes her a vital voice in the realm of socially conscious poetry. To view her work visit https://eveewing.com/.


Morgan Parker: Confronting Society's Expectations



Morgan Parker's poetry challenges societal expectations and celebrates the complexity of Black womanhood. Her collection "Magical Negro" examines the ways in which Black bodies are commodified and stereotyped, offering a powerful commentary on race and gender. Parker's voice is unapologetic, demanding attention and provoking thought. To view her work visit https://www.morgan-parker.com/.


These five Black poets are not only crafting remarkable verses but also contributing to a broader conversation about identity, justice, and the human experience. As we celebrate their distinct voices, we must recognize the importance of diverse perspectives in shaping the literary landscape. These poets are not just emerging talents; they are essential voices that demand to be heard, offering readers a chance to engage with the world through their unique lenses. As we continue to navigate the ever-changing currents of our society, these poets will undoubtedly play a crucial role in guiding us toward a more empathetic and understanding future.


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1 Comment


Thanks for sharing these voices with us, here in South Sudan. I am proud to read about them and their works. Let them continue to shine their lights in a dark world through poetry. I am a poet, too! I didn't know until 2016. I am 40 (41 this May).

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